Africa Top10 News

1Aeroponics Set to Lead Nigeria on the Path to Increased Food Production

Samson Ogbole

Samson Ogbole is trying to solve a problem many aren’t aware exists. In his native Nigeria there is a shortage of land needed to provide food for its ever-growing population of 190 million. There are only 30 million hectares of farmland under cultivation in Nigeria annually, short of the estimated 78.5 million needed for food production. It is this significant problem that Ogbole is tackling with an unconventional method of farming that involves growing crops in the air.

SOURCES: CNN

2Students Challenge Gandhi’s Legacy in Africa

Gandhi’s Legacy in Africa

A statue of Indian independence leader Mahatma Gandhi has been removed from Ghana’s most prestigious university following complaints that he was racist against black Africans. Several South African Gandhian advocacy groups, including one headed by Mahatma Gandhi’s granddaughter, have strongly objected to allegations of racism against the global peace icon.
SOURCES: Al JazeeraEconomic Times

3African Nations are Embracing this Ledger Technology to Weed out Graft

Africa blockchain technology

From South Africa to Nigeria, Ethiopia to Ghana, many of Africa’s largest economies that have long grappled with endemic corruption are turning to blockchain technology to curb financial crimes, target services to those in need and help crucial economic sectors.

SOURCES: Ozy

4Cambodia Seizes 3.2 Tonnes of African Ivory

3.2 Tonnes of African Ivory seized

The discovery of 1,026 tusks hidden in a storage container at the Phnom Penh Autonomous Port followed a tip off from the US embassy. Demand from China and Vietnam has meant Cambodia has become a key transit point for the illicit wildlife trade.

SOURCES: BBC

5Being more Respectful of Rights Enshrined in Zimbabwe’s Constitution

Zimbabwe's Constitution

Human rights organizations and opposition parties in Zimbabwe fear the “old days” are back after the government this week threatened to deregister civic organizations that get involved in politics. The National Association of Non-Governmental Organizations said Friday threats to shut down NGOs that meddle in politics caused them a “sense of shock”.

SOURCES: VOA

6Cross-border FGM is Becoming an Increasing Trend in East Africa

FGM Kenya

Girls in Kenya are being taken across the border to countries such as Uganda, Tanzania, Somalia and Ethiopia for female genital mutilation (FGM) to avoid a crackdown on the harmful traditional practice at home. Kenya criminalised FGM in 2011 with a minimum punishment of three years imprisonment and a U.S. $2,000 fine – spearheading efforts to curb the internationally condemned ritual with the most comprehensive anti-FGM legislation in east Africa.

SOURCES: Reuters

7Nigeria’s All Purpose Medication

Alabukun Powder

Packaged in distinctive white and red sachets, Alabukun Powder is a drug that Nigerians are convinced cures almost every ailment from minor headaches, fevers and pains to battling chronic rheumatism and arthritis. Medically speaking, Alabukun powder is an analgesic but it’s used in local traditional herbal medicine concoctions as commonly as it is used in modern medicine in Nigeria.
SOURCES: Quartz Africa

8Sifting through Fake News and Media Clampdown

Cameroon

In Cameroon, where English-speaking separatists are fighting the largely French-speaking government to establish a new nation, journalists covering the violence are increasingly finding themselves behind bars on a surprising charge: fake news.

SOURCES: Washington Post

9Some Friendly Rivalry in the Horn of Africa

Eritrea and Ethiopia

After July’s historic peace deal between Eritrea and Ethiopia, star Eritrean athlete Zersenay Tadese was able to compete in the Great Ethiopian Run in Addis Ababa for the first time. Eritrea and Ethiopia had been at war with one another since until 1998, over a border dispute.Despite the cessation of hostilities, the border had remained shut until a peace deal was signed between the countries leaders.

SOURCES: BBC

10The Tanzanian Sound taking the World by Storm

Tanzanian Sound

With up to 300 beats per minute, Singeli could be the world’s most frenetic music. In Dar es Salaam, its creators explain how it helps to create a better life.

SOURCES: The Guardian