Africa Top10 News

1Tanzania’s Economy Rises By 7.2 %

Tanzania’s Economy Rise

Tanzania’s economy grew by 7.2 percent year-on-year in the second quarter of 2019, up from 6.1 percent in the same period a year ago, buoyed by growth in construction, mining and communications sectors, official data showed on Sunday. In the first quarter of 2019, the East African nation’s GDP grew by 6.6 percent, according to the state-run National Bureau of Statistics.

SOURCE: CNBC Africa

2Plight Of An Ethiopian Journalist

Fekadu Mahitemework

A court in Ethiopia has sentenced a journalist to seven years imprisonment, a number of local media outlets reported. Fekadu Mahitemework who worked with the Enku Magazine, a local media outlet, was sentenced on charges of tax evasion. He was also handed a 7000 birr fine by the court.

SOURCE: Africa News

3Kenya’s Plastic Pollution Set To Change By 2020

Two years ago, Kenya banned plastic carrier bags. But with pollution getting worse, President Uhuru Kenyatta says single-use plastic will be banned altogether by June 2020. With new arrivals comes more waste and the landfill is expanding faster than the city itself.

SOURCE: Aljazeera

4South Africa’s Efforts To Avoid Day Zero

South Africa's Eskom

South Africa has imposed emergency measures, including rationing, to save dwindling water supplies after an abnormally hot, dry summer coupled with below average rainfall and a spike in usage pushes the country towards a crippling shortage.

SOURCE: Reuters

5Explore Africa’s Deepest Lakes

Africa’s Deepest Lakes

Africa is home to some of the largest, deepest, and all-round awe-inspiring lakes in the world. Most of the major lakes on the continent are part of what is known as Africa’s “Great Lakes”. These are a series of lakes that lie along the East African Rift Valley and connect with both the Nile and Congo rivers.

SOURCE: Africa.com

6Humanity’s Birthplace Pinpointed In Botswana

Humanity’s Birthplace

Where was the evolutionary birthplace of modern humans? The East African Great Rift Valley has long been the favoured contender. Our new research has used DNA to trace humanity’s earliest footsteps to a prehistoric wetland called Makgadikgadi-Okavango, south of the Great Zambezi River. Analysis, show that the earliest population of modern humans arose 200,000 years ago in an area that covers parts of modern-day Botswana.


SOURCE: Conversation

7Seychelles Leader Champions Climate Change Fight

President Danny Faure

President Danny Faure in an exclusive interview with The Associated Press says small island nations like his are the least responsible for the problem but among the most vulnerable as sea levels rise. “The science is clear,” he said. “The scientists have spoken. We all know that we have a problem. What is needed is responsible global action.”

SOURCE: VOA News

8Looming Catastrophe That Could Hit 2.3 Million Zambians

Zambian Drought


Communities across southern Africa have been affected by drought since late 2018. This year, large parts of southern and western Zambia received their lowest seasonal rainfall totals since at least 1981, the base year from which normal rainfall is benchmarked. At the same time, northern and eastern parts of the country were affected by flash floods and waterlogging, resulting in poor harvests.

SOURCE: Ventures Africa

9Google Doodle Honours Nigeria’s Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti

Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti

These days in Nigeria Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti is often remembered as “Mama Fela”, the mother of Afrobeat legend, band leader and activist Fela Anikulapo-Kuti. But Ransome-Kuti was a legend in her own right particularly when it comes to the story of Nigeria’s battle for independence and for gender equality. That’s why Google has recognized the matriarchal icon for its users in Nigeria.

SOURCE: Quartz

10A Marveling 900 Year Old Village On A Mountain

Shonke village

Shonke village is a 900-year-old settlement on the top of a mountain in Ethiopia’s Amhara region. Residents say they prefer their traditional stone-built homes to Ethiopia’s “shining cities”. About 20 generations have lived in the village, but residents now say half of the village’s estimated households have left in search of farmlands down the hill.

SOURCE: BBC